Moulin Rouge

Joe's Preview Review: 

Seeing Anthony Hopkins back as Lecter gets me excited. Julianne Moore as Clarice Starling scares me but Ridley Scott cushions the blow. This may not need as much directing as Gladiator but I'm sure Ridley's got it well in hand. I'll be on line February 9.

Joe's Film Review 

In Moulin Rouge, Director Baz Luhrman was trying to attempt
some kind of new age fusion. Explaining what he exactly was
trying to do would take a awhile but what I can was the
outcome was muddled and off the bulls eye.

The film is an attempt at a revival of the musical form. You
know the type of film where everything is a song. Luhrman
tries to get a more Rodgers and Hammerstein type musical
but he misses. It's more like halfway between the Sound of
Music and and a more modern, shocking musicals like The Rocky
Horror Picture Show.

By trying to take the best of both worlds, he lands right in
the middle. He's got the outlandish costumes of Rocky Horror
blended with the script and musical productions of The Sound
of Music. You know the epic pieces where you feel like giving
a standing ovation afterwards except here you look at the
screen flabbergasted and asking why.

The ovation is not merited is most of the musical numbers but
there are one or two that are major standouts especially the
opening number when you are sort of introduced to all the
characters.

The story is one about the most important thing in life,
love of course. The movie doesn't let you forget for one
second that it believes that love is the only and most
important gateway to happiness. Satine (Kidman) is the most
desired courtesan in France during the late 19th century, the
crown jewel of jolly, rhyming, Santa Clause-type red cheeked,
____ ___ (Jim Broadbent) proprietor of the Moulin Rouge.
Satine mistakes ____ (Ewan McGregor) for the Duke, a possible
investor in the Moulin Rouge. This mistaken encounter leads
to a forbidden relationship.

Brilliant moments flick by the screen at certain points,
magical moments like the fight scenes in Crouching Tiger,
Hidden Dragon. When you see one of these bright spots, some
hope will fill your heart but don't worry about it the hope
will pass through you like gas.

Expectations were high and were not met. Potential filled the
film but it was upset by corniness and ludicrousness. The
first musical scene you'll find interesting. The second will
feel unrealistic. By the third one, you'll be checking your
watch and completely uninterested in what's going on. The
novelty wears off real quick.

"Outside it may be raining, but inside here it's
entertaining." shouts Mr. ____ in his first introduction of
the lovely Satine. Followed by a rendition of "Diamonds Are a
Girl Best Friend". Renditions of classic U2, David Bowie and
Madonna songs are used to cause familiarity with the
audience. The most horrifying revamping was by far the
ensemble cast doing "Like A Virgin". I used to chuckle
whenever I heard that song but now I'm sure I'll never be
able to take the song seriously. It's all like the play that
is created as the central part of the movie, concocted and
wasteful

Dancer comparisons
people who shouldn't be singing do.
familiar songs.
constant/ breaks
more emotionally draining and creative
flashier / visually stunning

first love scene started the downhill.

collection of circus freaks inc. Lequizamo

Topsy Turvy was a lot better

high paced at first

AZ said so sad.
oscarworthy but not for the big categories (sets, costumes,
song)


Mr. Luhrman makes a valliant effort but its seemingly for
mostly naught. They are a few sucesses in a pile of failures.

 

Starring: Ewan McGregor, Nicole Kidman, John Leguizamo and Jim Broadbent.
Written by: David Mamet
Directed by: Baz Luhrman (Gladiator, Blade Runner)

Rating: 
Reviewed by: Joe Soria
Running Time: 
Rated R for 

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